“Fancy a sail?”: a bit of background

Illusion in New ZealandReading Doug’s post about cruising safety reminded me of our endless Skype conversations when we first got together. Telling me about some of the people he’d met sailing, on more than one occasion the seemingly happy little anecdote ended with ‘and the boat sunk’, or ‘and he died’. An explanation would follow of how, with a little more care, the disaster could have been avoided. I think this was meant to help me feel better about the idea of going on his boat sometime, but it got to the point where I made him tell me the ending first, so I could be prepared. Most stories, though, are better told from the beginning. For example, how does an English girl based in Spain end up in Canada, about to wave her American husband off on a six month (or maybe seven, every time I ask it gets a little longer) sailing trip? And aren’t you worried about being apart that long? Well, it happened pretty much like this… Continue reading ““Fancy a sail?”: a bit of background”

Each Summer I went swimming

Apart from wanting to spend Christmas with the family, one of the main reasons we went over to the UK these holidays was to be at the wedding of my lifelong friend, Vanessa. Living so far from friends and family means missing all sorts of important occasions, so it was fantastic to be able to get there for this one. And what a beautiful, elegant, warm, joyful occasion it was! Well worth the jet lag and all those hours trying to get the volume right on the in-flight movies. (Is it just me or does everyone spend most of the flight with your hand on the controls, trying to make out the dialogue without damaging your ears in the process?) Continue reading “Each Summer I went swimming”

Clouds from both sides

SeaClouds The journey from our place in Vancouver to see my family in the North of England involved two buses, the Skytrain, two aeroplanes, the London Underground, a short walk between Kings Cross and Euston (stopping in a for a swift half of real ale at The Euston Flyer), a train journey (made somewhat more fun by the free wine offered in first class) and finally a short car ride from the station to the house. Sailing certainly seems a more relaxing alternative… Continue reading “Clouds from both sides”

Community

Working at Rhizome I’d always thought of sailing as quite a solitary occupation – days out on the ocean with just the wind and the waves, all the time in the world to think and dream and wonder. So it surprised me to hear from Doug that one of the things he most loved about his past years of sailing were the people of all ages he met along the way and the sense of community they shared. Continue reading “Community”